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  1. #16
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    wirklich nice, was du alles so bereist... lohnt sich auf jeden fall. wuensch dir weiterhin viel spass beim hobby reisen
    The building turned it's back ignored my call.The concrete looks too thin to break my fall. The sunset stretched across this night time scene, I counted people as I neared the streets below. I saw it all, I saw it all go down. The shadow grew as he approached the ground. The sunset stretched across this night time scene. They turned away as he came near the streets below

  2. #17
    lol - in welchem alter sind denn deine kinder reif fuer geschichten von schwarzen maennern?

  3. #18
    Benutzerbild von LamaMitHut
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    wenn contempt damit beginnt kinder in die welt zu setzen, dann fang ich wirklich damit an, an darwin zu zweifeln. XD

  4. #19
    Zitat Zitat von LamaMitHut Beitrag anzeigen
    wenn contempt damit beginnt kinder in die welt zu setzen, dann fang ich wirklich damit an, an darwin zu zweifeln. XD
    aktuell bester deutscher wc3 spieler bekommt progamer kinder - evolution doesnt work.
    Ihr habt interesse an CoNteMpT's Bloodmage Replays? Dann checkt meinen Replaypack-Thread
    Fernsehn langweilt euch? Dann entdeckt CoNteMpT's WC3 Commentaries! Hier findet ihr alle Episoden!

  5. #20
    2ter Teil ist auch fertig nun:

    Region: Africa, Tanzania
    Travel time: 2012, June 20th to June 23th
    Picture Gallery: Link




    "This night will be very cold on the summit, expect -20°C", Nelson warns us and we fill up our camel backs with hot tea water, even though we know that this won't help much in six hours when we hopefully get close to the summit. We check our head torches and off we go into the night, following all the other lights in front of us. King William shouts out "Pole, Pole!" (Slow, Slow!) but in reality, we actually have a reasonable speed and pass one group after the other.

    Welcome to the second half of my Kilimanjaro Report, click here to read the first one.

    June 20th, 2012 - Barranco camp (3950m) to Karanga camp (3963m)


    A feel of joy surrounds me this morning, realizing that I was sleeping for a complete night finally. Unfortunately, Christoph and Jessie are not able to share these feelings, as they are both suffering from nausea now. "Today will be an easy day and you will have time to recover for the summit night", Nelson encourages them and we are really glad for this extra day on the mountain. I look up to the imposing Barranco Wall and it seems like a tough climb, lot's of porters and hikers are already queuing up in this narrow and extremely steep section.



    Turns out that the wall is not as tough as it looks, using my hands to stabilize from time to time, it is a fairly easy walk. The porters are not impressed either, as they are basically running up there with all their luggage. Well, we know that they are beasts by now :-) We reach the top of the wall after 45 minutes and enjoy the superb view on Kilimanjaro. "Ahh you like it ya?", King William of Kili says while looking at the sky, "you will have an even better view on him tomorrow." Speaking of the King, he is an incredible funny person, who will most definitely bring a smile on your face after a couple of seconds talking to him. He got his Nickname by guiding a blind man up to the top with his long term partner Nelson.



    We arrive at Karanga camp after crossing a valley, which contains the last water supply on the way to the summit. The sun is gone and the camp covered in a thick fog. Some crows are also present here and the place has a very creepy atmosphere now. The "toilets" are actually smelling so bad, one would actually be better off looking for another place to take care of his business. It's also freezing cold, but I still decide that it is time for a complete body wash before we head into the final stage, so get undressed and clean myself with the cold water. Totally refreshed now, I start to read my book and wait for dinner.


    June 21th, 2012 - Karanga camp (3963m) to Barafu camp (4550m)


    Yesterday's fog vanished away and we have a clear view on Kilimanjaro. There are lots of clouds in the distance though, blocking the sight on Mt. Meru (4565m). I was actually looking forward to this day and am disappointed now, as I can barely spot the mountain. We begin the 6km hike and the landscape looks familiar - lot's of lose rocks and a great views on Kilimanjaro, as we are heading to it's east side. My headache is gone and I'm feeling pretty good in general, Christoph and Jessie are also getting better as well, so everything is set for the big showdown!



    Arriving at our base camp for the summit night after four hours, Nelson explains that it got its name from the cold weather conditions up here on 4,550 meters, as Barafu is translated to "ice". The tents are already set up between two huge stone walls and we see the peaks Kibo and Mawenzi. Suddenly, the complete camp is starting to scream and laugh, turning it into an open air theater with a great atmosphere. I look up and can't believe my eyes - a tent from another tour operator is actually flying above us like a kite, quickly disappearing behind a wall after a couple of seconds. "The wind is very strong here because of the surrounding peaks", Nelson says, "they will send out some people to pick it up again".



    Our guides lead us to the path that we will use to climb the summit this night, it is important to see the terrain now while it is still bright. We climb up a couple of hundred meters and then sit down to have our final briefing. I enjoy the view on the camp and mentally prepare myself for the upcoming challenge. We will now have two hours to rest before lunch is served and then another seven hours to sleep. Excitement is rising and I crawl into my sleeping bag, trying to catch some sleep and recover my energy.


    June 22th, 2012 - Barafu camp (4550m) to Uhuru Peak (5895m) to Millenium Camp (3820m)


    A severe pain in my hip wakes me up. I guess it was a bad idea to sleep on the side when only a thin sleeping mat separates me from the rocks underneath - but it was just so damn cold! I patiently wait for the tea to reach drinkable temperature and already begin to put on my summit gear: two pair of thick socks, long underpants (borrowed from Simon), two pants, two icebreaker merino wool shirts (150 & 260), one fleece and my weather proof jacket should do the deal in combination with my hat and the gloves I got from Nelson.

    "This night will be very cold on the summit, expect -20°C", Nelson warns us and we fill up our camel backs with hot tea water, even though we know that this won't help much in six hours when we hopefully get close to the summit. We check our head torches and off we go into the night, following all the other lights in front of us. King William shouts out "Pole, Pole!" (Slow, Slow!) but in reality, we actually have a reasonable speed and pass one group after the other.



    Walking in this altitude with 50% less oxygen compared to sea level is different and I'm having a hard time to breath, but other than that I don't feel affected by it a lot. However, I have a pain in my stomach and begin to lose my sense of balance after two hours of walking. Definitely a sign of AMS. It becomes worse the higher we get and occasionally, I need to use my hands to stabilize myself. Nelson and King William are taking a close look at me and are always around to help me out if needed. I can barely see any stars in the sky, must be very cloudy up above.

    I keep on walking like a drunk guy and have to sit down to drink some water to recover on a regular basis. The water in my camel back already starts to freeze and it's getting hard to drink from it. We keep on passing group after group and it is a very tough and demanding walk, but eventually we reach Stella Point (5685m) around 5AM. Our guides provide us with hot tea and it is amazing to drink it now. I imagine to be very close to the summit now, but Nelson corrects that assumption as we have one more hour in front of us - Urgh!.


    The Video was supposed to be here. Unfortunately, I'm having some technical issues and will publish it another day.

    Entering a trance-like stage, I try hard to keep on walking in a straight line. It's also slowly getting brighter and finally King William announces that "Uhuru Peak is at the end of this path!". Bundling all my strength and energy, I rush towards the highest point in Africa (without falling!) as the first in our group. Only a handful of people are here already, we actually passed all other groups on our way up. The sun shows it's face through the clouds partly now, but the sight is still not good and it is strongly advised to descend again as soon as possible.



    Despite the -20°C on the summit, I take off my gloves to start taking pictures and film the rest on their final stretch to the top. Being in my trance, I don't even realize how freaking cold my hands are as I am handling my camera for at least five minutes, before finally putting back on my gloves. I would like stay for some time, but the guides urge us to go down again. Christoph shows symptoms of AMS as well and we're not able to get back as quickly as Moritz and Simon, who've been in a top shape during the complete trip. They form a group with Jessie and Nelson, while we are taking things a bit slower.

    It takes a couple of breaks before I slowly receive me balance back. Things are moving way quicker now and I'm actually running down the rocky surface, hooked into King Williams arms so we can both stabilize each other. We have a perfect view on the Mawenzi Summit (5148m) on our left and now most of the clouds disappeared, too bad we had such a bad view on the summit. I could barely see any glaciers at all :-(



    We reach Millenium Camp (3820m) six hours later after a break in the base camp, passing an altitude difference of 2,075 meters. In the evening, it's finally time to gather in the dining tent for the last time - I will not miss to sit on these small chairs, but I will definitely look back at all the great meals our cook prepared throughout our trip - he did an amazing job! Nelson and King William join us after the dinner and brief us about the appropriate way to tip the crew on the next day. It takes us 20 minutes to figure out a fair contribution before we retreat into our tents.


    June 23th, 2012 - Millenium Camp (3820m) to Mweka Gate (1980m)


    Everyone is in a good mood this morning and we talk about our achievement from last night. "You were having some problems over there Chris", Nelson proclaims, "but we noticed that you have a strong will and checked on your vital signs the whole time." I want to know how they did it exactly and King William explains: "We checked for any changes in the color of your eyes and tongue and let you walk in front of us to call your name. You reacted and did not throw up either, so everything was good." Interesting to hear! :-)



    It's time to contribute the tips and we receive another performance of the Kilimanjaro song before we continue back to Mweka Gate (1980m), which is about five hours away. We contain a fast pace on the muddy surface and eventually decide to take things even faster by running down with our hiking poles. Moritz is filming with his Go Pro camera and it is certainly quite some fun to do speed up for a couple of minutes, eventually we are exhausted though and maintain a regular fast pace. We are now en route since nearly three hours and I ask our guides how long it would take. "About one hour from here", they reply and it sounds O.K. as we would have saved one hour. Turns out that the gate was just around the corner :-)



    We register at the gate and decline any shoe-cleaning offers before getting into our 4x4 jeep to drive back to Moshi. We drop our stuff in the office of Ahsante Tours and continue straight on to the Glacier bar, which also belongs to the same company. A last dinner is supplied here and I'm having a delicious fish together with a Kilimanjaro Beer. Our guides give a last speech and hand over the certificates to proof that we made it to the top of Uhuru Peak.

    Today is also the quarter final game between Spain and France and we head to the glacier bar to watch it and finally drink lot's of beer - it's about time! King William joins us as well and it certainly a great way to end this fantastic week of great experiences. I would like to thank my fellow trekkers, guides and the rest of the team for an amazing time. Hakuna matata!

  6. #21
    So hab mal wieder einen Bericht fertig bekommen - der Trip war mir eine Lehre im Bezug auf Bergbesteigungen, aber lest selbst:

    Region: Europe & Switzerland
    Travel time: 2011,August 13th to August 16th
    Picture Gallery: Link
    Link to report: Link




    I'm completely exhausted after ascending a nearly vertical rock formation for nearly 20 minutes on my way back from the summit. Descending down from Europe's highest hiking mountain already takes me a solid five hours since getting off the beaten path in thick fog at the top. Even though this will not be a good preparation for my upcoming Kilimanjaro climb in terms of altitude, it certainly shows me how serious it is to summit mountains and how careful you have to be in bad weather...

    It is a nice sunny Sunday afternoon and I'm on the way to a small Swiss village called Visp. Moving down south from there deep into the Pennine Alps, I make my way to the Barrhorn (3610m) - the highest walkable summit in the Alps. All you need is a good pair of shoes; crampons or Ice axes are not required as the mountains' main route never has any snow. Most of my equipment is brand new, including a super light 1kg / 58L backpack from Osprey and I can't wait to finally use it.

    Sitting in the train and enjoying the nice green landscapes of the Alps, I reflect on the beautiful day I had in Bern yesterday, including some close up contact with Bears in their mini zoo and a night of festivals which was luckily taking place during my stay. As usual, Couchsurfing was a great tool to connect to the locals and I met a lot of funny Swiss chaps. The train ride is very comfortable and I use the time to explore my new camera, a Sony Alpha A35. Turns out it has a ton of features and great picture quality compared to my old Superzoom - I can't wait to use it outdoors!

    [/url] First sight on Bern.

    [/url] Night of Festivals with all sorts of Instruments!

    [/url] Bear Park Bern.

    I have to take another bus, cross a huge airstrip and use a funicular to finally start the hike with my heavy backpack that contains everything I need to provide myself with food and shelter for the next days. The sun is coming out and I'm happy to make good progress on the way up to the Turtmann hut, located at 2.519m. A conversation with a fellow hiker slows me down a bit and I reach the dam (2.363m) while the sun is long gone and its getting dark very quick.

    My plan is to set up my tent somewhere behind the hut and I have to hurry from now on if I don't want to set it up in total darkness. It's just 156 Meters to the hut from here, but the path is very steep now and my feet are letting me know that it's about time for a long rest now. I eventually make it and decide to set up my tent close to the hut after asking the owner for permission - I just can't be bothered to cook in the dark now!

    [/url] Time to start the hike!

    [/url] First view on the glacier.

    [/url] Nice light looking back.

    [/url] My camp site :-)

    The warmth of the sun wakes me up and I look at an amazing glacier after zipping down my tiny tent entrance - I just love these moments! I'm up in no time and start to walk - luckily I can leave my tent behind as I will come back the same route. I reach the first exposed section after half an hour, using some steel ropes to scramble along the rock. Nothing too fancy though.

    Just minutes later, the sky turns grey and it starts to rain - luckily I'm prepared in terms of clothing and rain cover for my backpack. It’s just a pity that the sight gets worse and worse as I climb up higher. Missing out on the great views one would have here during a nice day, I at least have the glacier as a constant companion to my right side.

    It's pleasant to meet two other hikers and their little dog as it is very quiet here today considering the fact that this is a very busy mountain usually. They are telling me that they won't go all the way to the top as the weather keeps getting worse. We do a bit of talking, take some pictures and I then continue up to the summit on my own, it should just be about half an hour away from here...

    [/url] People walking on the glacier.

    [/url] On the way to the summit.

    [/url] Getting closer...

    [/url] Looking down.

    Half an hour later, I am still wandering through what turned into a complete weather disaster. The visibility is not much better than 5 meters at stages and I am struggling to find the next sign post leading me to the summit. The wind is also getting stronger and stronger and it's turning into a very unpleasant situation. I move forward on all sorts of surfaces: big stones, small stones, gravel and ice for instance. There are also some passages to climb up smaller rocks and all of that is not easy in those conditions.

    I keep on going though and am now stuck at a very exposed spot. The wind nearly blows me away here and I need to find shelter behind one of the bigger rocks to wait for better conditions. I have no idea where to go as I am not able to see the sign posts anymore! Sitting behind the big rock, I can just tell that in front of me must be an enormous cliff - unfortunately the fog is too thick to even tell if that is true or not and I don't want to find out by getting too close to the edge.

    From time to time, the fog vanishes and reveals the great landscape surrounding me. It is amazing to witness how quickly the weather changes from absolutely no visible to a nearly panoramic view - just to change back to fog only seconds later. I use one of these precious seconds to spot the next marker up a rock and finally reach the summit and it's ice-covered cross moments later. I was so close all the time while I was waiting for the wind to go away!

    [/url] The sky clears up and I can finally see something up there.

    [/url] Very bad weather close to the summit...

    [/url] .. but eventually I'm able to see the cross!

    [/url] It's cold in the wind.

    The icy cross at 3.610m marks one of the highest spots you can be in Europe without using climbing gear, but unfortunately, the weather conditions do not allow me to just sit and wait here for better weather. I start going down again while the weather keeps getting worse - no chance to see any signposts again! I keep walking and walking and slowly start to wonder where I actually am. Nothing looks familiar anymore and I can't find the way back marked on my map that should be somewhere here.

    Eventually I realise that I missed the correct path and am now lost. Now it's important to stay cool and keep a clear head. I decide to walk back to the summit and then return on the exact same path I was coming from. Shortly after heading back. the weather finally starts to improve now and I can see what lies ahead of me. I can actually spot the hut in the distance now and wonder if there is any chance to get there without walking back in a circle.

    I keep on walking in the same direction now, getting closer to the hut. About 20 minutes later, I can't continue anymore from here as the mountain becomes very steep and it would be too dangerous to get down here. I'm low enough now to be out of the fog and have better view on my surroundings for most of the time. This allows me to find the best way back off the beaten path and I decide to continue side wards towards another cliff instead of scrambling all the way back up on the very loose gravel.

    Getting to the cliff takes a lot of concentration as I need to constantly back my self up with my hands and very carefully cross several icy spots, slipping here now would be very uncomfortable! I eventually make it to the cliff and can see the glacier being very close to me already. That's finally some good news, because it means that I'm certainly on the right way. If I could just make it down here, I should be able to reach the path again and finally come back to the hut after a good four hours of walking around at the top already!

    [/url] The weather slowly gets better after I got lost on the way down.

    [/url] Great view if you can see something...

    [/url] The steep cliff I had to scramble down.

    [/url] Finally back on the track!

    [/url] Time for a nice meal in the hut!

    Sitting on all four, I slowly make my way down the cliff. It is very steep indeed and I have to be super careful again to not slip down here. My gloves and backpack are already showing the results of constantly being very close to the rock, they both look like I've used them for ages and are full of dirt. The further I get down, the more I realize that this is a pretty serious situation. Should I be stuck at some point, it will take a very long time to climb up again and look for the proper way - at least five or six extra hours at this stage which would mean that I'd need to walk around in the dark.

    I keep my focus and make sure that every step is well placed and that my hands are always holding on to something. Suddenly, my heart stops beating for a second as some rocks slipped away underneath my shoes and I can barely hold on to the wall with my hands - that was close! There is no turning back now and so I keep going down, very carefully and very slowly... It's been an hour on the cliff now and I finally manage to get off it, looking down to an immense scree field that I need to cross now. Nothing easier than that after getting down the cliff!

    The path must be very close now and although I am very tired from the last very intensive five hours, I am also very happy to be down the mountain and back to normal terrain. I have to hurry up now as it's getting dark and there is still a good hour walking ahead of me. To make matters worse, I hit my knee at a rock while nearly running down towards the now visible path. I need to take a ten minute break before I can continue and have some time to relax for a bit as well.

    Finally arriving at the hut in darkness, I am certainly not getting my camping cooker out now! Instead, I will go to the hut and have a nice proper meal there. It just tastes amazing after the adventure that I just went through and I'm getting very tired very quickly... The next morning brings amazing weather and I walk back to the valley, skipping the alternative route that I originally wanted to take - I just spent too much time on the summit yesterday.

    The rest of the day is very pleasant as the sun is constantly burning down on me and there is no time pressure or other obstacleon my way. I enjoy the landscape and am looking forward to get home again, one adventure richer and one important lesson learned: You should never climb a mountain of that altitude on your own...


    That's it - enjoy some sunny pictures to round this report up:

    [/url] Billy Goats are very interested in me :-)

    [/url] Going back to the village.

    [/url] Luckily the sun is out this time!

    [/url] Crossing the lakes again.

    [/url] Close up of the lake.

    [/url] Nearly back!

    [/url] Even saw some animals in this trip ;-)

  7. #22
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    und matterhorn steht auch bald an ?
    The building turned it's back ignored my call.The concrete looks too thin to break my fall. The sunset stretched across this night time scene, I counted people as I neared the streets below. I saw it all, I saw it all go down. The shadow grew as he approached the ground. The sunset stretched across this night time scene. They turned away as he came near the streets below

  8. #23
    Hm mal schaun wann ich wieder in die Schweiz komme - aktuell bin ich eher bissl weiter weg utnerwegs

    Habe nun das Video auch fertig geschnitten - ist sogar auf Deutsch

    http://chrisontour84.wordpress.com/2...-video-german/

  9. #24
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    Benutzerbild von rem1xx
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    warst mal in neuseeland? da unten trifft man auch ne menge netter menschen die mit einem so trips machen - und natuerlich die landschaft... auch teils weit ab vom schuss alles. koennte dir zusagen!
    -die stahlseile an der felswand... zum einhaken oder nur festhalten?
    The building turned it's back ignored my call.The concrete looks too thin to break my fall. The sunset stretched across this night time scene, I counted people as I neared the streets below. I saw it all, I saw it all go down. The shadow grew as he approached the ground. The sunset stretched across this night time scene. They turned away as he came near the streets below

  10. #25

  11. #26
    wie finanzierst du das alles?


  12. #27

  13. #28
    Was machst du beruflich?


  14. #29
    Consultant bei AOL!

    Bevor es auf Weltreise geht kommen natuerlich vorher noch ein paar Trips, einer davon auf unserer groesste Insel, Groenland.

    Wenn jemand zufaellig Erfahrung in langen Wanderwegen hat und gut mit ner Kamera umgehen kann und zudem noch ne coole Sau ist, dann bitte lesen und eventuell melden

    http://chrisontour84.wordpress.com/2...and-june-2014/


    LG
    Chris

  15. #30

    Reisebericht Grönland, Russell Gletscher

    Hey!

    Habe mal wieder einen neuen Reisebericht fertig bekommen, falls sich jemand für Grönland interessiert kann er ja mal reinschauen

    "A detour to the Russell Glacier is a common activity on the Arctic Circle Trail, allowing you to reach the inland ice of Greenland after a 25km hike from Kangerlussuaq. Joined by a total stranger, I am ready to go and full of excitement to set foot on the world’s biggest Island and last place to witness huge ice bergs outside of Antarctica.."


    Für den Bericht einfach aufs Bild klicken:



    LG,
    Chris

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